The Flipped Classroom

The Flipped Classroom

You go to school or university, your teacher teaches a lesson where you learn a huge amount of new material and then sets you homework on it. The homework is often where the real work beings; where you have to apply the new knowledge you've learnt, or analyse the information you've been given. And you’re left to do it all alone (or going to your parents for help). You find there are bits you don’t understand, but when you go to the next lesson, the class is on to the next topic.

Sound familiar? This has been the way talk-and-chalk teaching has worked for a long time. But some teachers have decided to try something new: they are flipping their classrooms.

What does this mean? Instead of doing the new learning in school, and building on it at home. You do the learning first as homework, and the exercises in the lesson, with the help of your teacher. This new style of teaching is largely possible thanks to modern technology. Teachers can record videos of themselves doing the ‘talk-and-chalk’ bit (probably without the chalk) and upload them to YouTube for their students to watch. Students can then come to school the next day ready with any questions they have, instead of discovering problems when they get home.

Want to know a bit more? Read up on Flipped Classrooms here or follow Chris Waterworth’s blog about his Flipped Classroom teaching journey. And we’d love to hear your thoughts on our Twitter and Facebook – whether you’re a student, parent or teacher.