Living on a Shoestring: Charity Shop Shopping

Living on a Shoestring: Charity Shop Shopping It’s no secret that most students lack a disposable income, live on baked beans and wear pyjamas to university lectures… Well that was all an enormous generalisation and actually not true of most students, but it is a time in your life when counting the pennies really does matter.

It’s no secret that most students lack a disposable income, live on baked beans and wear pyjamas to university lectures… Well that was all an enormous generalisation and actually not true of most students, but it is a time in your life when counting the pennies really does matter.

It’s no secret that most students lack a disposable income, live on baked beans and wear pyjamas to university lectures to accentuate just how hard done by they are.

Well that was all an enormous generalisation (and hopefully not still true of most students?) but it is a time in your life when counting the pennies really does matter. It’s also the time when you want to look your best – there aren’t many other periods of your life when you will be surrounded almost exclusively by young attractive people in your home, lectures, pubs and nights out.

This is when charity shop shopping must come in. You may not be able to afford true Versace vintage, but that doesn’t mean you can’t look the part. Visiting charity shops is the ideal way to dress in unique, one-off, classy threads (ignoring the fact that there’s a good chance someone has died in it).

Rules to charity shop shopping:

1. Location, location, location. It really does matter. Pop in to a charity shop in the middle of a student area and you will find old bits of material that used to be Primark t-shirts and un-wearable garments from the boring high street retailers.

Get out of the student zone, and as close to where wealthy people live as possible. It sounds crude, but it’s true – that’s where you’ll find the good stuff.

2.Have an idea of what you want. Unless you want to come home dragging furniture, bin bags of clothes, old Disney jewellery and a cat basket for a cat you don’t own, it is a good idea to already know what you’re there for. I personally never listen to this advice, but it certainly seems sensible.

3.You’re in a different world. People can fail to realise the absolute gem they have come across simply because it’s surrounded by junk, smells like a farm and costs £3 (what garment worth buying could cost £3?). Other people, like myself, get caught up in the charity shop atmosphere and become convinced that absolutely everything suits everything else, and it’s suddenly fine to wear an ankle length trench coat with a neon sun hat. …Try to keep some perspective.

4.It’s not just clothes. There’s no need to live in a bare, characterless house just because none of you have yet accumulated furniture or decorative items of your own. Pool in some money together and see what you can find – at the very least you can kit the house out with some great paintings of cats which you can then pass off as being ironic.

Enjoy! You will soon become addicted, so there’s a new way to spend your student loan!